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Jo, palliative care nurse specialist


Jo Merritt knew early on in her nursing career that she wanted to specialise in palliative care. She was drawn to the role because of the way it looks at all aspects of a patient’s life, not just their condition.

Now Jo is one of four palliative care nurse specialists at Milton Keynes Hospital. She is based on the Macmillan unit, but can be found in many areas of the hospital.

“We follow the patient, not the ward,” says Jo. “If a patient is admitted to a ward, we will visit them there, if they need to attend a clinic or come into the unit for symptom control, we’re there to support them if needs be.”

Palliative care nurses are clinical nurse specialists who care for people with advanced illness. They are concerned with caring for the patient’s whole needs – not just physical. Jo is one of a tight-knit team which includes colleagues Emma Goodship, Anna Moore, and Wendy Black, They all work closely with Haley Coetzee, our palliative care discharge nurse, who does her utmost to try and ensure that patients spend their final days in their preferred place. They all liaise extensively with specialty doctor Ben Dietsch and consultant Dr Jane Wale.

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Julie, newborn hearing manager and team

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Newborn hearing manager Julie Stones and her team offer a crucial service to new parents, testing their new babies for hearing loss.

At least one in every 900 babies born in the UK will have a permanent childhood hearing impairment that can significantly affect their language and social development. This figure increases to about 1 in every 100 babies who have spent more than 48 hours in intensive care. The majority of these babies are born into families with no experience or history of hearing loss.

Julie and her six staff are always on hand to screen newborns’ hearing before they go home from hospital.

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Tracey, Falls Prevention Coordinator

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With an ageing population, Milton Keynes Hospital is committed to providing elderly patients with the best care in hospital and a smooth transition to life back at home.

New roles have been created to achieve this, including the addition of a Falls Prevention Coordinator and a Lead Nurse for Dementia.

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Debbie and Julia, A&E Receptionists


Receptionists have an essential role as part of Milton Keynes hospital’s frontline staff. They are the first link for many patients who can be in pain, upset or anxious when they arrive.

And the role is even more demanding for the 20 staff who work round the clock in our A&E reception. 

They are a close-knit team who have to use a wide range of skills, from efficient administration, to empathy and understanding when dealing with patients and their relatives.

Audrey Boden, A&E operations co-ordinator, is full of praise for the receptionists.

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Helen, Pathology Support Manager


A love of the TV drama Quincy has led to a career in pathology spanning almost 30 years for Helen Botwood.

Helen has been the Pathology Support Manager at Milton Keynes Hospital for the past ten years, previously working as a biomedical scientist specialising in haematology and blood transfusion.

She heads up the Pathology Support Unit, a team of 33, comprising phlebotomists, clinical support workers and porters.

Helen said: “I originally wanted to be a vet but I needed straight As for that. I was a big fan of Quincy, a forensic pathologist, and my mum’s friend managed to get me work experience at the QE2 Hospital where I saw the biomedical scientists at work. It wasn’t Quincy but it really interested me.”

She qualified as a biomedical scientist while working at the Luton and Dunstable Hospital and then moved to Milton Keynes.

She said: “There are 140 plus people here working in pathology. Our job is to analyse samples – blood, urine, faeces, nail clippings, sputum, tissue – you name it, we’ll analyse it.”

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  • Statement regarding usage of vaginal mesh

    At Milton Keynes University Hospital we do not use vaginal meshes for primary prolapse surgery due to higher complication rates when compared to non-mesh repairs.

    It is not recommended by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and the British Society of Urogynaecologists (BSUG) as first line treatment for vaginal prolapse and the evidence behind the potential risk and benefits is still awaited.

    Our urogynaecologists use vaginal sub-urethral slings for management of stress incontinence and laparoscopic (keyhole)/abdominal meshes for recurrent prolapse or prolapsed uterus. Alternative treatment options are available for these conditions and women have the right to choose their options.

  • Governors Elections

    The close of ballot for the Governors Elections has now taken place and we are now able to bring you the declaration of results.

  • Milton Keynes Hospital set to launch new electronic patient record system

    A new electronic patient record system that will improve the way Milton Keynes University Hopsital cares for local people is set to go live at the hospital on 14 and 15 April 2018, and it’s called eCARE.

    eCARE is more than just a new computer system – it will give the hospital’s doctors and nurses access to improved up-to-date information so that they can deliver safer, more efficient and more timely care.

    It means that every time hospital staff record a patient’s health information, it will be stored in the system. That means patients won’t have to keep giving staff the same information over and over again as they move through different parts of the hospital.

    eCARE will collate patient details in one easy-to-access place that is secure and confidential. This includes medical history - including laboratory test results, prescriptions, allergies and current prescriptions. Previously, this information may have been stored in many different places and in many different forms that were not easily accessible to clinicians.

  • MKUH Public Board Meeting - 9 March - Change of venue

    Milton Keynes University Hospital’s next public board meeting is due to be held on Friday 9 March 2018 at 10am. This meeting will now take place at our offices in Witan Gate House, Central Milton Keynes. If you are intending to come along, please report to the main reception desk inside the building and a member of staff will meet you. Please ensure that you register with a member of MKUH staff for building security reasons. The address for Witan Gate House is 500-600 Witan Gate. Milton Keynes, MK9 1BA.

    Please note parking is available in central Milton Keynes although you are strongly encouraged to arrive early – for a map of the best appropriate parking locations, please click here.


    Milton Keynes University Hospital is currently extremely busy due to a number of acutely unwell patients requiring treatment.
    To allow the hospital to see and treat those patients that require immediate and urgent care, please only attend the emergency department if you are seriously unwell. The hospital is strongly encouraging patients to consider whether they can access the care they need from their GP, a pharmacist, by dialling NHS 111 or by visiting the local Walk-In Centre before coming to A&E.

As a teaching hospital, we conduct education and research to improve healthcare for our patients. During your visit students may be involved in your care, or you may be asked to participate in a clinical trial. Please speak to your doctor or nurse if you have any concerns.